.
A Fork-Like “What am I?” Quiz
What am I? これ何? -- Minobe Onigawara Workshop (美濃邉鬼瓦工房) -- Otsu, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/4.5, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
What am I?
これ何?

I came across these fork-like tools on a craftman's workbench, and thought they'd make a good What am I? Quiz. What, exactly, are these fork-like tools used for?

クゥイズ:この工具は何のためでしょうか?


Tasty Yakiniku Near Kyoto: Hieidaira’s Nanzan
Ready to Cook at Yakiniku Nanzan (焼肉南山), Otsu Japan -- Yakiniku Nanzan (焼肉南山) -- Hieidaira, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 at an effective 25mm — 1/50 sec, f/4, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos
Ready to Cook
at Yakiniku Nanzan (焼肉南山), Otsu Japan

For the first time in ages, this evening we had a grill-at-your-table dinner at Yakiniku Nanzan (Hieidaira location).

I didn't have my camera with me, so I'm putting some photos from 2007 (seven years ago!) that I found in my image library.

We go in fits and spurts, but I think this might be the first time this year. It didn't disappoint.

I always order karubi (marinated short-rib beef), and today had six portions, which are described as for a single person but they're pretty small. It wasn't quite the gluttons affair of the now-closed all-you-can-eat beer/BBQ buffet that I wrote about in years past, and since I was driving there's no beer, but we ate well.

Yakiniku Nanzan (焼肉南山) -- Hieidaira, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 at an effective 82mm — 1/350 sec, f/2.8, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos

I took these photos almost a year before my first post on polarization filters, so perhaps I didn't really know about them yet. Now, one glance at the photo above and I know it would have benefited greatly from one.

The meat shown in these photos is gyutan, a name I prefer to the English. It's okay, but I much prefer kalbi.

Yakiniku Nanzan (焼肉南山) -- Hieidaira, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 at an effective 25mm — 1/180 sec, f/2.8, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos

If you find yourself in Kyoto or Otsu and can get up to Hieidaira, Nanzan is highly recommended.


A Day with Sergey Kolychev in Kyoto
Sergey Kolychev at the Heian Shrine (平安神宮) Kyoto Japan, Nov 2013 -- Heian Shrine (平安神宮) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/1250 sec, f/2.5, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Sergey Kolychev
at the Heian Shrine (平安神宮)
Kyoto Japan, Nov 2013

I'm finally getting around to photos from last November, when old Yahoo co-worker Sergey Kolychev paid me a visit. (He's not old, our co-worker status is).

In the intervening three years since his prior visit he'd become fluent in Japanese to the point that he can read novels, which just blows my mind. Japanese is at least his fourth language (after Ukrainian, Russian, and English), so maybe they get easier as they stack up.

We packed quite a bit into one day. We started out with a visit to the Heian Shrine...

Heian Shrine (平安神宮) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/250 sec, f/2.5, ISO 220 — map & image datanearby photos
Heian Shrine (平安神宮) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/1250 sec, f/2.5, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos

We then popped over to the Nanzen Temple...

Nanzen Temple (南禅寺) -- Nanzen Temple (南禅寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/2.8, ISO 560 — map & image datanearby photos
Nanzen Temple (南禅寺)
Sergey and a Big Rock -- Nanzen Temple (南禅寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/1.4, ISO 180 — map & image datanearby photos
Sergey and a Big Rock

We somehow found a little hiking trail back beyond the Eikando Temple, which provided a nice view of the city through the trees...

Sort-Of View of Kyoto -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/2000 sec, f/1.4, ISO 100 — image data
Sort-Of View
of Kyoto
Memorial Plaque and a three-legged crow -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/2, ISO 125 — image data
Memorial Plaque
and a three-legged crow

People often put up little wooden plaques as a memorial of their hiking trip, such as the bigger board above placed by a group of 13 people ranging from 79 years old down to five months old. I wouldn't have paid the crow a second thought, but Sergey noticed that it was a three-legged crow, which is apparently a thing. You learn something new every day.

When then moved north to the Hounen-in Temple (法然院), which has appeared on my blog of late here, here, and here.

The thin depth of field in this next shot makes it looks a bit unreal...

Entrance Gate Hounen-in Temple (法然院) -- Hounen-in Temple (法然院) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/1.4, ISO 360 — map & image datanearby photos
Entrance Gate
Hounen-in Temple (法然院)

This next shot, of Sergey standing under the gate, looks a bit unreal because I made a mistake and severely underexposed it, so had to employ HDR-like post processing to recover a usable image...

Hounen-in Temple (法然院) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/1.6, ISO 140 — map & image datanearby photos

I sort of tried to replicate this old point-n-shoot shot that has for some reason always stuck in my mind...

desktop background image of the water basin at the Hounen-in Temple (法然院), Kyoto Japan -- Hounen-in Temple (法然院) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/1.6, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
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We moved north to the Silver Pavilion and its famous sand sculptures, which I posted about the other day. Here's one more shot of the lush moss there...

desktop background image of lush moss at the Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺), Kyoto Japan -- Lush Moss at the Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/250 sec, f/2.5, ISO 250 — map & image datanearby photos
Lush Moss
at the Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺)
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Growing boys must be nourished, so we repaired over to a tea cafe for choux à la crème...

Shoe Cream at Kitayama Kouchakan (北山紅茶館) (The Japanese word for this kind of cream puff is 「シュークリーム」 which sounds like the English “ shoe cream ” ) -- Kitayamakouchakan 北山紅茶館 -- Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/250 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1600 — map & image datanearby photos
Shoe Cream
at Kitayama Kouchakan (北山紅茶館)
(The Japanese word for this kind of cream puff is 「シュークリーム」 which sounds like the English shoe cream)

I opted for coffee, but Sergey is a connoisseur of fine tea, as Fumie can be sometimes, so I've been to this shop many times.

Sergey mentioned some knee pain that had been bothering him for a long time, so I brought him to the best masseur in Kyoto, Kentaro Kataoka. Sergey had never had a real massage before, so it was quite an experience.

Working the Calf 片岡健太郎の治療院 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/1.4, ISO 900 — map & image datanearby photos
Working the Calf
片岡健太郎の治療院

I've had many massages in America, but after having had massages in Japan, I'd never classify what I had in America as a real massage. They're more like shove some skin around a bit and hope it relaxes you sessions. These in Japan are closer to physical therapy. In a blog post about Japanese massage a couple of years ago, I described this masseur's technique as a ferocious pinpoint attack like his fingertips are tactical weapons trying to massage the muscle from the inside out. It can be very effective, but painful at the time.

Controlled Stretch -- 片岡健太郎の治療院 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/1.4, ISO 1100 — map & image datanearby photos
Controlled Stretch
The Eyes Say It All first acupuncture experience -- 片岡健太郎の治療院 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/1.4, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
The Eyes Say It All
first acupuncture experience
Now in the Arm -- 片岡健太郎の治療院 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/1.4, ISO 1600 — map & image datanearby photos
Now in the Arm

(I describe my hit-n-miss experiences with acupuncture here.)

Sergey thought the whole experience was great, so I'm glad that Kataoka-sensei was able to work us in at short notice. He'd been out for his daily jog when I called, and kindly cut it short just for us.

Newly refreshed, we popped over to the Chion'in Temple (知恩院) to see its big main gate...

Chion'in Temple (知恩院) -- Chion'in Temple (知恩院) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/6.3, ISO 4000 — map & image datanearby photos
Chion'in Temple (知恩院)

A shot from this visit appeared in a post half a year ago, on Huge Main Gate of Kyoto’s Chion’in Temple.

We then moved to the famous Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺)....

Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/6.3, ISO 720 — map & image datanearby photos
Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺)
Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/6.3, ISO 900 — map & image datanearby photos

The late-afternoon light was rich.

desktop background image of a view from the Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺), Kyoto Japan -- Looking Back to the Entrance Gate of the Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/8, ISO 320 — map & image datanearby photos
Looking Back to the Entrance Gate
of the Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺)
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This World Heritage Site temple is perhaps most well known for its big balcony...

Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/1000 sec, f/1.6, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos

Better shots of it, from years past, appear here, and here, and here.

But it's best of all with a friendly face...

Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/50 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Late-Afternoon Light at the Kiyomizu Temple -- Kiyomizu Temple (清水寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/320 sec, f/1.6, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Late-Afternoon Light
at the Kiyomizu Temple

Sand Sculptures at Kyoto’s Silver Pavilion Temple
The Golden Pavilion and its “ moon-viewing platform ” conical sand sculpture Kyoto Japan, November 2013 -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/400 sec, f/1.4, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
The Golden Pavilion
and its moon-viewing platform conical sand sculpture
Kyoto Japan, November 2013

Last fall I visited the Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺, the silver pavilion) in north-east Kyoto. It's named for a building that was intended to be coated in silver leaf (comparable to how the golden pavilion is coated in gold leaf). Apparently they never got around to actually applying the silver, but the name stuck.

As it is today, the temple is noted for its sculptured sand, including a huge Mt. Fuji shaped cone.

Entrance Stone Garden -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/200 sec, f/1.6, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Entrance Stone Garden
Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/400 sec, f/1.6, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos

The minor entrance stone garden is not particularly special, with similar features easily found at other temples. But the main garden raises the level considerably...

desktop background image of the sculpted sand in the garden at the Silver Pavilion, Kyoto Japan (銀閣寺) -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/500 sec, f/1.6, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
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Perfect -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/2.5, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Perfect

There's also a curvy/wavy raised sand feature that's better seen from above...

Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/2.5, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos

I suppose it's supposed to evoke the sea or water or something, but I'm not sure.

Curved Edge a couple of feet tall -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/250 sec, f/5.6, ISO 220 — map & image datanearby photos
Curved Edge
a couple of feet tall
desktop background image of the sculpted sand in the garden at the Silver Pavilion, Kyoto Japan (銀閣寺) -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/2.5, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
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Edge Detail -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/2000 sec, f/2.5, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Edge Detail

I'd love to know how they construct these, and how often. I imagine that the sand is quite hard packed, but we've had some monumentally torrential rains of late that dump a month's worth of rain in an hour, so I wonder how these sculptures hold up. I looked around on YouTube and found these three videos, which give some insight.

A path leads through a more-traditional garden and up the mountain a bit, to give the nice from-above view we saw before.

desktop background image of a garden path at the Silver Pavilion, Kyoto Japan (銀閣寺) -- Garden Path -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/400 sec, f/1.4, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Garden Path
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“ Moody Trees ” -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Moody Trees

The focal point in this photo is unrelated to the focus point, which may be really annoying to some. Compare to these shots of similar trees at the Heian Shrine.

Wide View from Above -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/1250 sec, f/1.4, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Wide View from Above
desktop background image of a slope of rich moss at the Silver Pavilion, Kyoto Japan (銀閣寺) -- Mossy Slope -- Ginkakuji Temple (銀閣寺) -- Copyright 2013 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 24mm f/1.4 — 1/80 sec, f/1.4, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Mossy Slope
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Testing a Couple of Watches: Stührling and Citizen
A Watch a cheap watch, but serviceable -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/ -- This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/8, ISO 1250 — image data
A Watch
a cheap watch, but serviceable

As I mentioned in the comments on last month's post about horrid watch-marketing copy, I've been looking for a nice watch with a combination of features and simplicity and size that no one seems to make. So after years of keeping my eye out, I finally decided that perfect is the enemy of good enough and went ahead and bought some cheap watches just to try.

I'm glad I did because I found out some new ways in which what you see in advertisements is not necessarily what you get, and I also found that what I though was important in theory wasn't always important in practice.

The first watch I tried:


Fossil Men's Chronograph Townsman Navy
$110 at Amazon.com

This was a huge compromise from what I wanted in that it's casual and has stopwatch fluff, but I liked the deep blue face, and with the bright hands it seems to be eminently readable. So many watches these days, whether cheap crap or an $85,000 Patek Philippe, don't seem to have basic look-at-a-glance legibility. If you can't read it, what's the point? (I guess the point of wearing an $85,000 Patek Philippe that you can't read is to advertise that you can afford to wear an $85,000 Patek Philippe that you can't read.)

Unfortunately, this Fossil Townsman was horrible.

The hands, which look bright in the photo, are actually dark metal with a mirror finish. If they reflect something bright then you see them as bright. Otherwise, they disappear into the black of the face (which indeed looked black, even in direct sun, and not the dark navy blue described by Amazon's prose and photos). So I couldn't read the time on the thing except in good circumstances. It was frustrating, so I returned it.

I did the same with the $125 light-cream colored version of the same watch that I'd bought at the same time, for the same reasons.

Running out of time to enjoy Amazon-US prices and selection before returning to Kyoto, I tried two more watches, and ended up keeping them.

The first is a $165 Stührling Original Symphony Eternity GMT...

Stührling Original Symphony Eternity GMT -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/ -- This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/8, ISO 4500 — image data
Stührling Original Symphony Eternity GMT

This too is a great compromise over what I sort of think I want in a watch, but for $165 I can give it a try.

The good:

  • Easily readable across a wide range of lighting conditions, including dim.
  • The face is not too small (42mm) and the case not too thick (13mm).
  • Automatic: it has no batteries to need changing, and winds itself.
  • A fairly simple, uncluttered face. (Photos make it look more busy than it really seems.)
  • Has a name with an umlaüt. Makes it look old-world classy. Ümlaut means class, you know.
  • Safe to swim with, so safe in the rain.

The bad:

  • I wish it was a bit bigger, much thinner, and had a cleaner design around the outside edge.
  • Such a low price for an automatic (self-winding) watch brings worry about quality.
  • The date and GMT boxes are too small/difficult to read even with glasses. I didn't even bother setting them.
  • Luminescent features (hands and dots around the face) are worthless. Fireflys are an order of magnitude brighter.

The GMT box is supposed to show the hour in some other timezone, which could indeed be quite useful for me living in Japan, but I knew before I bought it that the box would be too small to read without glasses, so I'd not be able to rely on it. Indeed, I can't read it even with glasses unless the lighting is really good.

I can read it in this photo I took for this post, though:

Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/ -- This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/8, ISO 5000 — image data

The face looks a bit busy with the wavy pattern, but in practice it just seems like a mild background texture.

It's advertised as water resistant to 50m (165 feet), which makes me feel I should be able to wear while swimming as deep as I could ever swim, but the manual says shallow water. This is apparently a well-established racket of inflated ratings used across the watch industry. Water resistant to 10 meters makes you think it's okay to shower or swim? Nope. The manual says such a rating means "withstand splashes of water while washing the hand, but should not be worn while swimming".

Once you learn the code you can understand what you're getting, but until then it seems wildly deceptive to me. But it seems to be a standard in the watch industry.

The other watch that I kept is the casual Citizen Eco Drive Black:

Citizen Eco Drive Black -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/ -- This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/8, ISO 6400 — image data
Citizen Eco Drive Black

This cost $130 at Amazon. Its primary attraction for me is that despite being a quartz it doesn't ever need a battery change because it gets charged via light through the face. The manual says that two minutes in direct sun will keep it running for half a year.

It's quite readable, but again, the luminescent features are worthless. When I was a kid you could literally read a book by the brightness from the luminescent hands of a kid's watch, but these days it's all worthless. Geez, a little radioactivity never hurt anyone.

This Citizen is the same size (42mm) as the Stührling, so I wish it were a bit bigger, but this one is less of a fashion statement. Not that I have much to do with fashion statements anyway. I can't read the date (so didn't bother setting it), but hey, 19~this one is water resistant to 100m!