A Visit to Suntory’s Kyoto Beer Brewery
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Fresh Out of the Oven so to speak  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2200 — map & image datanearby photos
Fresh Out of the Oven
so to speak

Two months ago I posted about a visit to Suntory's Yamazaki whisky distillery a ways south of Kyoto. After that tour was done, we (Paul Barr and I) hopped into a taxi for the 10 minute ride to hit the tour at Suntory's beer brewery, in Nagaokakyo city, an area where I happened to have lived in the mid 90s.

Unlike the old distillery, which is full of sweet aroma and deep, rich photogenic character at every turn, the beer brewery is a bastion of modern sterile industrial design, featuring all the warmth and character of the inside of a hospital's stainless-steel sink.

Brewing-Vat Icebergs they extend far below floor level  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 — 1/320 sec, f/4, ISO 560 — map & image datanearby photos
Brewing-Vat Icebergs
they extend far below floor level

Since there was nothing really appealing to my normal photographic interests, I thought I'd see what I could do with the “industrial look”. The big pipes running into these things, seen from a distance in the center of the shot above, offered a lot of detail...

Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 720 — map & image datanearby photos
desktop background image of the industrial piping at Suntory  --  Rigid  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1600 — map & image datanearby photos
Rigid
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desktop background image of the industrial piping at Suntory  --  Flow  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2000 — map & image datanearby photos
Flow
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A closer-up version of the photo above is the first pic in “A Dual Photo Ying-and-Yang-ish “What am I?” Quiz” from the other day.

Update: this photo makes an excellent login-screen photo. I'm using it for the login screen on my NAS, and I'm tickled with the apparent appropriateness of it each time I encounter it.

Tapered  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
Tapered

I was much more in my element in the drinking room after the tour, where you get two big glasses of beer (or juice or tea).

My Glass #1  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 3600 — map & image datanearby photos
My Glass #1

I made ample use of my camera, not because I wanted to possess an advertisement-worthy picture of a beer glass, but because I wanted to see whether I could produce an advertisement-worthy picture of a beer glass. Just dabbling to see what I can do is the same reason I took pictures of the transit of Venus, the recent annular eclipse, or the staged whisky shots seen in the distillery-visit post. (I look at “Trying My Hand at Product Photography” from five years ago, where I did something similar, and cringe.)

Anyway, these shots are more for my own fun, along the lines of “half the fun is getting there”. Most have had a fair amount of post processing in Lightroom.

Oops the beer-glass equivalent of a tree sticking out from someone's head  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1100 — map & image datanearby photos
Oops
the beer-glass equivalent of a tree sticking out from someone's head

I felt that the background rows of cans had potential for something interesting, but I just couldn't find it.

Zzzzzzzz......  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 640 — map & image datanearby photos
Zzzzzzzz......
Tasty  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2500 — map & image datanearby photos
Tasty
Master of the Tap  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 3200 — map & image datanearby photos
Master of the Tap
Pull  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2200 — map & image datanearby photos
Pull
Me in Action (if your definition of the word “action” is generous) photo by Paul Barr  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Paul Barr
Nikon D3 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 44mm — 1/200 sec, f/4, ISO 1600 — map & image datanearby photos
Me in Action
(if your definition of the word “action” is generous)
photo by Paul Barr
The Human Element  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2200 — map & image datanearby photos
The Human Element

I probably appreciated the human element more than the beer, and the more beer I appreciated, the more I appreciated everything. 🙂

After everyone had their drinks in hand, there was a presentation on the proper pouring technique for this particular brew (which, if I would have paid attention fully, I would be able to recount, but I merely recall that the procedure was somehow different for this brew than for most beers.)

Presentation of the Glass  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/640 sec, f/2.5, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Presentation of the Glass
Initial Pour to produce the head?  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos
Initial Pour
to produce the head?
This Point Seems Important if only I had been paying attention  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1100 — map & image datanearby photos
This Point Seems Important
if only I had been paying attention
Pride in Her Work a perfect glass  --  Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Pride in Her Work
a perfect glass
Suntory Beer Kyoto Brewery  --  Nagaokakyo, Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2500 — map & image datanearby photos

The second photo on the ying-and-yang quiz is an extreme close-up of the lip of a full glass, with not much in focus except part of the rim and some of the bubbles on the head of beer.

Continued here...


All 4 comments so far, oldest first...

Jeffrey, can you please include the g+/facebook like buttons bellow your posts? I really like the pictures and posts you are sharing.

I appreciate the sentiment, but when I had the buttons before, I never had an indication that they were ever used. If they were ever used, I didn’t know how to figure out whether there was any side effect of them being used. They seemed to provide no function as far as I could tell…. )-: —Jeffrey

— comment by Boris on June 15th, 2012 at 2:26pm JST (4 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink

Whiskey factory tour; beer factory tour; pretty Japanese women wearing flight attendant clothes; pouring cold beer –dude that’s like a quintuple positive… two times. Oh and you were mentioning something about photography, I think…

— comment by Ron Evans on June 16th, 2012 at 5:28am JST (4 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink

In a similar vein… going through my catalog, I’m somewhat embarrassed by the number of attempted “ad quality” photos of Guinness being poured, settling, in the process of drinking, partially full and empty glasses… and then poured, settling, in the process….

For some reason they never get better! 😉

Then by all means you should practice more! 😉 —Jeffrey

— comment by JasonP on June 16th, 2012 at 11:47am JST (4 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink

Son and I did the tour too, though with the high blood sugar I have, no beer for me. Had considered making another stop in Kyoto on the way back from Shikoku, but one look at the batallions of r high school kids on the Shinkansen platform made up our mids for us.

— comment by Bob Barlow on June 22nd, 2012 at 8:08pm JST (4 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink
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