Shogo and Namiko’s Wedding: Reception, Part I
NOTE: Images with an icon next to them have been artificially shrunk to better fit your screen; click the icon to restore them, in place, to their regular size.
Banquet Reception Entrance Shogo and Namiko -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Banquet Reception Entrance
Shogo and Namiko

Continuing from my earlier posts about my brother-in-law's wedding on Saturday, after the hors d'oeuvre reception, there was the full-on banquet reception.

Oops no idea what was going on here, but I somehow like the result -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 14-24mm f/2.8 @ 14 mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Oops
no idea what was going on here, but I somehow like the result
Shogo Standing at the Head Table those flowers were my nemeses for the day -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 135 mm cropped — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1400 — map & image datanearby photos
Shogo Standing at the Head Table
those flowers were my nemeses for the day
Namiko Seated at the Head Table with much better behaved flowers -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm — 1/160 sec, f/2.8, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Namiko Seated at the Head Table
with much better behaved flowers
Father of the Bride across the way -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm cropped — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 2800 — map & image datanearby photos
Father of the Bride
across the way

Update: the crop above was suggested by reader Parv, and indeed it's better of the FOB. I'd also wanted to share a sense of the room, but perhaps there's not much sense gained (so to speak) by avoiding the crop, so I'll use it. For reference, the original version I posted, sans crop, follows...

( Originally-Posted Uncropped Version ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
( Originally-Posted Uncropped Version )

I was seated at the back end of the front-left table, so again I was happy to be at the edge out of everyone's line of sight, so I could get up and move around in my area fairly freely, without bothering anyone.

There was a welcome speech by Shogo's uncle (Shogo's dad's sister's husband), who having been a large-company CEO, was quite good at giving speeches....

Welcome Speech by Shogo's “Uncle from Yokohama”, which is how he's always called within the family -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 4000 — map & image datanearby photos
Welcome Speech
by Shogo's “Uncle from Yokohama”, which is how he's always called within the family
Pro At Work even her hair scrunchie is formal black ( though her flash gel seems to be CTO ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 175 mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Pro At Work
even her hair scrunchie is formal black
( though her flash gel seems to be CTO )
More Speeches this one by an ikebana master who had taught Namiko since she was a little girl -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 28 mm — 1/125 sec, f/4, ISO 1250 — map & image datanearby photos
More Speeches
this one by an ikebana master who had taught Namiko since she was a little girl
Preparation for the First Toast -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 116 mm — 1/400 sec, f/2.8, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Preparation for the First Toast
His Turn -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 105 mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1600 — map & image datanearby photos
His Turn
Everyone Had 17 Glasses, Each and 24 forks, but only 15 spoons ( or so it seemed ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm — 1/125 sec, f/4, ISO 4000 — map & image datanearby photos
Everyone Had 17 Glasses, Each
and 24 forks, but only 15 spoons
( or so it seemed )
Table Nearest Us Shogo's childhood friends ( the man at left ended up giving the first toast ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm — 1/125 sec, f/4, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
Table Nearest Us
Shogo's childhood friends
( the man at left ended up giving the first toast )
Something About This Smile reminds me of Zach Braff -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 190 mm — 1/100 sec, f/4, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
Something About This Smile
reminds me of Zach Braff

The girls at the table in the background saw my big Nikkor 70-200 f/2.8 zoom lens pointing their way, and did a peace sign for the camera. (Pretty much all Japanese reflexively do a peace sign at the first sight of any camera pointed their way.)

Peace at 200mm -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm — 1/125 sec, f/4, ISO 5000 — map & image datanearby photos
Peace at 200mm
Toasting the Couple -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200 mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 4500 — map & image datanearby photos
Toasting the Couple

Then the food started....

First Appetizer the salmon-based pink stuff was out-of-this-world delicious -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/125 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2200 — map & image datanearby photos
First Appetizer
the salmon-based pink stuff was out-of-this-world delicious

Shogo and Namiko also started to eat as well, which I thought was impressive, since couples tend to not get to eat anything at their own wedding. But it was short lived, as friends started streaming up to honor the couple by pouring them a drink...

“Kanpai!” ( cheers! ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/125 sec, f/5.6, ISO 2000 — map & image datanearby photos
“Kanpai!”
( cheers! )
And Another... -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/125 sec, f/2.5, ISO 4000 — map & image datanearby photos
And Another...
... And Yet Another .... -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/125 sec, f/2.5, ISO 2800 — map & image datanearby photos
... And Yet Another....

In theory each man in attendance could pour Shogo a drink, which would quickly lead to one comatose groom, so I was reminded of a story I heard in grad school from an American guy whose wife was Japanese. At his wedding in Japan, everyone had been pouring him drinks... it's a common social convention in Japan that pouring a drink for someone shows them honor... and he was quickly getting drunk. He didn't speak much Japanese at the time, but his new father-in-law sitting nearby, eventually realized that the groom had actually been drinking all the drinks, and motioned to the big potted plant next to the groom: take a ceremonial sip of the drink, then quietly ditch the rest into the plant. Aaaaaaaah, this made it much easier!

I didn't notice any plants near Shogo, except for those blasted flowers right in front of him (in a clear vase, no less), so I'm not sure how he handled it. As far as I know he doesn't even drink alcohol — at all — but perhaps that's just another example of how I didn't know him.

Continued here...


All 3 comments so far, oldest first...

Great photos, as usual. Your stylish food photography is a visual treat.

— comment by Zara on October 6th, 2010 at 7:20pm JST (6 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

Does anybody know what is that white piece with a bow on bride’s head?

On right side of “Father of the Bride” image reflection in glasses of the person sitting competes for attention with the bride’s father. The glass with water, lying below the fancy glasses, seems like a good place to crop.

I think the white bow thing is called a “bow” :-), or perhaps is a softer take in a “tiara”. I agree about the crop… I’ve made the change above (though in futzing with it, I found that I could get a really creepy vibe by leaving just the leftmost glass with the waitress’ face in it. 🙂 —Jeffrey

— comment by parv on October 6th, 2010 at 7:54pm JST (6 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

Jeffrey, photos sparkling enough to make one want to get married. And maybe fret a little over the imagined expense.

Incidentally, I much enjoyed the trial run with Lightroom 3. I overworked it a little in a few shots, but now that it has expired, I feel buck naked.

— comment by Philip on October 19th, 2010 at 7:23pm JST (6 years, 7 months ago) comment permalink
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