Fumie’s Brother Shogo Weds Namiko
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Shogo and Namiko emerge from the chapel ( with his folks waiting at left, her folks at right ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/8000 sec, f/1.4, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Shogo and Namiko
emerge from the chapel
( with his folks waiting at left, her folks at right )

Fumie's brother (my brother-in-law), Shogo, got married yesterday, to Namiko Shimoya, in Nagoya Japan.

I was there as a guest, but of course I had my camera, so took a few snapshots (about 1,200). I hold out hope that at least a few came out.

The day's events started with a short ceremony in a Western-esque chapel, then a short hors d'oeuvre reception, then the full-on wedding reception party. I've only glanced at the photos from the first part so far, so that's what I'll present in today's post.

I've written before about Japanese chapel weddings here, though this time there was no “minister” as featured in that post. Also unlike that post, which features photos taken during a fake wedding to demonstrate a hotel's chapel for prospective couples, this was a real wedding and I couldn't move around, so all photos inside the chapel were from my seat (which, being husband to the groom's sister, was in the photographically advantageous front row, and thankfully at the end of the row, so I knew that I wouldn't be blocking anyone else's sight lines).

Getting Seated Anthony, Fumie, and Fumie's folks in the front row ( I'd overexposed the shot in camera, and took the vibe further in Lightroom ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1600 — map & image datanearby photos
Getting Seated
Anthony, Fumie, and Fumie's folks in the front row
( I'd overexposed the shot in camera, and took the vibe further in Lightroom )
Shogo Enters First escorted by his parents -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/320 sec, f/1.8, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Shogo Enters First
escorted by his parents
Waiting for His Bride completely at ease, totally enjoying the day -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/800 sec, f/1.4, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Waiting for His Bride
completely at ease, totally enjoying the day

I've known Shogo for 13 years, since he was a senior in high school, and I realized at the wedding that I've never really known him. He's always been the quiet type... friendly and affable, yes, but quiet, a man of few words. So I was completely surprised at the outgoing, totally at-ease man we experienced, on top of the world and just thrilling to a fun day. It was wonderful.

Namiko Shimoya makes her entrance, being given away by her father -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/400 sec, f/1.4, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Namiko Shimoya
makes her entrance, being given away by her father
Veil Has Been Lifted -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/400 sec, f/2.5, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Veil Has Been Lifted
Anthony Brings in the Rings an old hand at it, having done it twice before ( here and here ) -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/125 sec, f/4, ISO 720 — map & image datanearby photos
Anthony Brings in the Rings
an old hand at it, having done it twice before (here and here)
Placing Her Ring -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/125 sec, f/4, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Placing Her Ring
Presentation -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/125 sec, f/6.3, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Presentation

There were various ceremonies, such as having the best man and bridesmaid sign the wedding registry as official witnesses, and eventually....

Ave Maria -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm — 1/800 sec, f/2.8, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Ave Maria

The wedding venue had an interesting design... the couple exited the chapel via the doors at the back, into what appeared to be some other room, and the doors closed behind them. Then almost immediately, the doors opened again and the chapel was flooded with brilliant sunlight. It turns out that there were two sets of doors separated by a thin hallway; the outside pair remained closed when the couple exited the chapel, then when the inside pair was closed, the outside pair was opened to the sunlight, and then the inside pair was opened to let the sunlight flood in. It was quite a dramatic effect.

In the brief moment when both pairs of doors were closed, the couple stepped out of sight in the in-between hallway, and waited there as all the guests exited the chapel and lined the set of steps just outside. Then the couple made a grand exit from the chapel at the top of the steps, and descended the stairs amid a shower of flower petals that the guests had been provided....

Exiting the Chapel to a shower of flower petals -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/8000 sec, f/1.4, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Exiting the Chapel
to a shower of flower petals

At the very top of the steps were the couple's parents, followed by close relatives and then more-distant relatives, and then friends spilling off the bottom of the steps. I should have been next to Fumie (in the purple kimono above), but this one time I stepped out of my place as a guest to get a better photo.... the venue offered an excellent location to get photos from a great vantage, but none of the official photographers were there, so I felt it was worth while to take the opportunity to try for some unique shots for them.

Gauntlet of Petals -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm — 1/4000 sec, f/7.1, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Gauntlet of Petals
Surrounded by Friends -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm — 1/2000 sec, f/7.1, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Surrounded by Friends

The arrangement on the steps was designed to give the parents and close relatives the best position, but in looking at the photos, I realize it's really a great metaphor for life. The couple start out first with family (that they didn't pick, but were born in to), and progress toward the friends that they have chosen for themselves.

Photo Op #18 of 623 -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 36 mm — 1/2000 sec, f/7.1, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Photo Op
#18 of 623
Two Things Everyone Had a smile and a camera -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 85mm f/1.4 — 1/8000 sec, f/1.4, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
Two Things Everyone Had
a smile and a camera

Everyone was then repositioned on the stairs for a formal portrait, this time with the couple and close family up front at the bottom of the stairs, and friends in back at the top. (For this I put my cameras away, of course.)

After the formal photo I recollected my camera as the couple headed in, and I got this shot that really stands out in my mind...

Shogo Waves to His Buddies -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm — 1/5000 sec, f/5, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Shogo Waves to His Buddies

I would have never imagined the Shogo I thought I knew doing this, but the new Shogo (or the old Shogo newly revealed to me) was on top of the world and thoroughly enjoying the day, and had no problem letting everyone feel and share in his joy.

Another photo I really like, taken moments later....

My Honey and Our Boy -- Wedding of Shogo and Namiko -- Nagoya, Aichi, Japan -- Copyright 2010 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm — 1/1600 sec, f/5, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
My Honey and Our Boy

We all then went inside for phase two, the short hors d'oeuvre reception.

Continued here:


All 9 comments so far, oldest first...

Wonderful photos. You must have a really NICE camera! (Sorry=just couldn’t resist that) Beautiful bride with a very handsome father., the groom was handsome and so were his parents. But his sister was exquisite…I loved the “My Honey and our Boy” shot.
Did wonder a little about the stark white of the wedding chapel. Don’t most brides wear white there? She and the groom, also in white, seemed to disappear into the background at times. Was that hard from a photographers point of view?
Enjoyed this post very much. Love, Mom

The brightness is an aesthetic choice on my part, done in post processing (except for the “Getting Seated” one, which was overexposed in camera by accident). I can lower the brightness of the lead photo, for example, and return all kinds of detail to her dress, but I like the bright effect for the chapel shots… feels sort of angelic, which matches the whole white-dress bridal concept. The two dads were really spectacular in their formal tuxes, and I’ll certainly have more on them in later posts, and everyone else as well, I’m sure. —Jeffy

— comment by Grandma Friedl on October 3rd, 2010 at 11:38pm JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

Beautiful photos and thoughtful comments. I especially loved the kimonos worn by the mothers and Fumiye-san. Loved her hair also!

Aloha ~

— comment by Diane on October 4th, 2010 at 2:48am JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

Great post – The Japanese know how to do events, and their wedding chapels (faux churches) are one of the best examples. This sounds like it’s a very interesting venue – and they definitely give a “white wedding” opportunity.

Very nice cam work.

— comment by AdelaideBen on October 4th, 2010 at 8:39am JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

Sorry, but my favorite photo is “My Honey and our Boy”. Fumie looks so graceful and pretty, and oh! what a beautiful kimono! I like Anthony’s pose it is so natural, paceful, happy…
Very nice picture!

Griselda. Arlington,TX

— comment by Griselda on October 4th, 2010 at 9:48am JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

As always, great pictures!

It’s fascinating to see Japanese weddings. Much different than weddings here in China. I’m impressed by the modern churches, with the bright interior and the illuminated floor.

Thanks for sharing.
Andy

It’s not a church, but a “chapel” in a modern wedding venue (a business that does only one thing: host weddings). They do eight a day. Google Earth satellite photos from 2007 show a house there, and street view shows an empty lot, so the building is likely less than two years old. —Jeffrey

— comment by Andy on October 4th, 2010 at 10:20am JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

Congratulations to the new Mr. And Mrs. Matsunaka! Great post. I’ll bet they’ll love the photos AND the post processing you did.

The shot of Shogo in “Waiting for His Bride” is one of my favorites – it might have been THE favorite except I keep distracting myself thinking his back pocket was turned inside out. (maybe photoshopping the edge of the podium away would be good, or more likely it’s just me 🙂 ) (Good idea… done. —Jeffy)

“Getting Seated” is really great, because I love a)how Fumie and her Mom are laughing together, and b) how awesome Fumie’s hair looked. I noticed it in that first shot, and confirmed it in each subsequent shot. Hair, outfit, attitude – I wish *I* could do elegant like that!

Even though the photos of Shogo and Namiko were fantastic, I’ll have to echo the others in saying “My Honey and Our Boy” is the best shot of the set.

— comment by Marcina Kreta on October 4th, 2010 at 10:29am JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

Some of these are simply breathtaking … Placing Her Ring, Presentation and My Honey and Our Boy … Sensational !!!

— comment by Chris Belyea on October 4th, 2010 at 4:44pm JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

“Getting Seated” seems like a still, where people are sitting in a inter-space flight, from a science fiction movie|series which starts with Utopian dream.

— comment by parv on October 6th, 2010 at 7:45pm JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink

I found your site through a tweet by Christopher Kimball of America’s Test Kitchen about the bento boxes Fumie makes for Anthony. (You gotta love the internets.)

As soon as I started looking at your photos and reading your commentary, I felt I had found very interesting new friends. I am hooked on your blog.

This sequence of wedding photos is glorious. I would think the bride and groom must be very glad you were there – for more than just family reasons.

I am enjoying your wildlife photography too (again – your commentary makes each story even more intriguing). Congrats and keep it all up!

[I am in Plano, Texas, USA – a suburb of Dallas.]

— comment by Cynthia Edwards on October 15th, 2010 at 11:44pm JST (7 years, 2 months ago) comment permalink
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