A New Caledonia No-Bikes-Allowed “What am I?” Quiz
What Do I Mean ? クイズ :このニューカレドニアの交通標識はどういう意味でしょうか? road sign in Nouméa, New Caledonia -- Nouméa, South, New Caledonia -- Copyright 2015 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/2015-12-15/2657 -- This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Panasonic LX100 at an effective 46mm — 1/200 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
What Do I Mean?
クイズ:このニューカレドニアの交通標識はどういう意味でしょうか?
road sign in Nouméa, New Caledonia

Driving around during our vacation in New Caledonia, I came across a number of road signs whose meaning was not intuitive to me, including the one above. I thought it might make a good What am I? quiz.

The sign obviously doesn't mean No Bicycles Allowed or I wouldn't be posting it here.... unless, of course, I'm doing the whole reverse-psychology thing to fake you out. But then again, I may well be doing the whole reverse-reverse-psychology thing to fake you into thinking I'm trying to fake you out.

Frankly, I'm so confused now that I don't even know. Anyway, what do you think the sign means?

As is usual with these quizzes, I'll hold all guesses privately until I publish the answer in a day or three.

UPDATE: I've posted a hint here.


All 25 comments so far, oldest first...

No bicycle parking?

— comment by Damien on December 15th, 2015 at 1:45pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

If signs there follow the same logic than “Mainland France”, this would mean that this precise path is for cars or pedestrians, and bicycles should take a neighbouring track (usually from left to right cars / bicycles / pedestrians)…

— comment by Bruno on December 15th, 2015 at 1:54pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

My guess is either no bike parking or no chaining bike to trees

— comment by Kenny K on December 15th, 2015 at 1:56pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

“Don’t leave bikes chained to palm trees.”

— comment by Shigenori on December 15th, 2015 at 2:12pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

The sign without the red line across it would indicate a road or lane that bicycles must use; so the crossed sign probably marks the end of such a lane.

— comment by Daniel on December 15th, 2015 at 5:06pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

I’d guess: end of bicycle path.

— comment by Nicolas on December 15th, 2015 at 8:17pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

Clearly it means no bicycles that lack brakes, spokes, drivetrains and all the other essentials that the image is lacking.

— comment by Henry on December 15th, 2015 at 9:48pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

Hello Jeffrey,
it’s easy : it means “end of the mandatory bike road” .
French rod signs are slashed when the instruction (obligation, or piece of advice etc…) is put at end.
By the way, I love your blog that I read for 5 years now.
David ,
A french boy, from Paris (but who travelled a bit , including in New Caledonia)

— comment by David G. on December 15th, 2015 at 9:54pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

“No bicycles without riders” i.e., don’t leave a bike unattended, especially locked to one of these trees.

— comment by John Pane on December 15th, 2015 at 10:51pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

Do not lean bikes against the palm trees.

Some risk of damaging trunks ?

— comment by Andy on December 15th, 2015 at 11:48pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

My guess is that they don’t want you to park and chain your bike to the palm trees.

— comment by Grandma Friedl, Ohio, USA on December 15th, 2015 at 11:57pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

It means the mandatory lane for bicycles ends right after the sign.

A blue round sign is an enforcement sign. With a bike on it, you have to ride your bike on the specific lane dedicated to cyclists. The red ribbon accross the sign puts an end to that lane. So you have to share the road with the others again.

— comment by Sébastien on December 16th, 2015 at 3:52am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

No bicycle parking?

— comment by Rick H. on December 16th, 2015 at 4:00am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

Since New Caledonia is a French territory(?), I’m guessing that French/European road sign rules apply, and therefore perhaps it is a “End-of-bicycles-only-zone” sign. Writing from Kensington, MD, USA where we don’t use that system of signs.

— comment by Jacob on December 16th, 2015 at 4:17am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

Not a parking area for the bicycles

— comment by Nancy on December 16th, 2015 at 11:20am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

Hi Jeffery,

How about no bike riding on the beach.

John from southern Florida

— comment by John on December 16th, 2015 at 11:33am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

This sign is used in my country (Czech Republic) for pathways reserved for bicycles (bycycle path, cycle track). Crossed one at the end, not crossed one at the beggining. Crossed one just mean you are no longer on the road reserved for bicycles. Looking forward to see if it has the same meaning in New Caledonia.

— comment by Michal on December 16th, 2015 at 6:06pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

I think it’s obvious. A permitted sign is blue. The red dash through the middle means “ends”. So this is the end of a cycling path.

Of course it’s easier for me living in a cycling friendly European country. And the signs are standardised to a point, allthough I’ve never seen this one before. I checked online and it’s not an offical sign in Germany. But as stated, quite obvious in it’s meaning.

— comment by Daniel Cutter on December 16th, 2015 at 6:38pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

This is a cycle path End Sign. In Germany biker must use this cycle path with this sign without the red line marking. Sign No. 237

50 Points against cycle paths in Germany http://www.velofahren.de/e_50-reasons.html

— comment by Heiko on December 17th, 2015 at 1:08am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

“Keep to the Left of a Bike” is the only thing that comes to mind if the meaning was not “No Bicycles Allowed” (short of searching for traffic regulations in Nouméa, New Caledonia).

— comment by parv on December 17th, 2015 at 1:14am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

I’ve posted a hint here:
http://regex.info/blog/2015-12-17/2658

Once I make all the answers public, those prior to this comment are ones submitted before I posted the hint.

— comment by Jeffrey Friedl on December 17th, 2015 at 8:47am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

The bike lane is going to end (you are going to merge with car traffic)

— comment by Luc on December 17th, 2015 at 1:08pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

I suspect the traffic system is British with driving on the left side. The direction the photo was taken would indicate you were standing on the right side of the road. If you were riding on the bike path, you would be on the wrong side of the traffic. A better sign would be “Stay on the left”. My two bits worth.

— comment by Larryt168 on December 17th, 2015 at 9:56pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

This is easy for someone who has lived in Europe. That sign means “end of bike lane”. Round signs with blue background mean something is mandatory (although strictly speaking a bike lane sign does not mean bikers cannot ride on the road), round signs with white background and red circle mean a prohibition. The red stripe just means the end of the previous sign (if it was from a prohibition sign, both the circle and the stripe should be gray).

— comment by Tiago on December 20th, 2015 at 7:42pm JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink

I’ve posted the answer to the quiz here:
http://regex.info/blog/2015-12-22/2660

— comment by Jeffrey Friedl on December 22nd, 2015 at 8:13am JST (1 year, 10 months ago) comment permalink
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