Another Short Stroll in Kyoto, Another Set of Pictures
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Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/200 sec, f/5.6, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
Cutting Edge
of cliché captions

I took the camera with me on an errand a short walk from home the other day, and snapped a few photos. I was perhaps inspired because it was the day after this year's trip to the most-excellent Eikando Temple where Anthony had shown an eye for photography well beyond his years. Other than the errand, I had no specific plan, so just wandered.

an orange leaf
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1600 — map & image datanearby photos
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I liked the color of the leaf above, though the wind made it tough to get a clear shot.

The Incline at Keage is always a pretty place...


Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/640 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
The Incline
Kyoto Japan

In the 1880s, a 20km-or-so-long canal was built from Lake Biwa (Japan's largest lake) to Kyoto, where at this location (The Incline) a pair of cars on wide rails would bring boats up and down a 30m change in altitude, to a smaller canal that brought them to the Kamo River. Boat traffic having ceased long ago, the incline is now a pleasant walkway.

Along with the canal and the sudden 30m change in altitude came Japan's first electrical generation plant, which supported Japan's first streetlights (on my street, Niomon Dori) and Japan's first street trams. The power plant has been out of use for decades, but it remains in what appears to be well-kept order.


Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1800 — map & image datanearby photos
Pipe
large enough to walk in
At Japan's first hydro-electric plant

The main building, built in the late 1880s, still stands likely as it did 100 years ago...

a vine-covered window at the 120-year-old brick building of Japan's first hydro-electric power plant
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/5.6, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
All Kinds of Wrong
off center, conflicting shapes.... but not boring
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Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/5.6, ISO 5000 — map & image datanearby photos
Zzzzzzz....

Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/320 sec, f/5.6, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
Boooooring

Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/640 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Thin

Back closer to home, the trees lining Jingu Michi (“Shrine Street”, which dead-ends at the Heian Shrine) were mostly laden with rust-colored shriveled dead leaves, but one tree stood apart in the same kind of glorious richness that got its brethren across the street an appearance in 2007's post “Photo Essay: Why I Hate Living in Kyoto”.


Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/400 sec, f/4, ISO 2200 — map & image datanearby photos
Mottled Richness

The few green leaves that remained were set off by their scarcity...

pretty leaves
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/800 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Looking Up
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Finally, a snapshot of a pair of ducks in the canal, after futzing around with it heavily in Lightroom....

some ducks on the Biwako Canal in Kyoto Japan
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/500 sec, f/2.5, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Just Ducking Around
with some over-the-top “subtle” post processing
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All 4 comments so far, oldest first...

It has been a while since I found your blog, and I always find something really nice in it. In this post I really like the autumn colors, the Prunus serrulata(1st and 2nd pic) and the tulip tree(9th, 10th pic) (Liriodendron tulipifera). Its interesting that decent cultivars of not native(alien species) trees are used for street or park trees in cities. Of course the cherry is native but the tulip tree is from America. I have never seen tulip trees in cities they might have a good stress tolerance in urbanized areas.
Thanks for the nice pics!
Are there many streets are planted with tulip tree?

Endre from Hungary.
🙂

Thanks for the info… no, the tulip tree doesn’t seem to be all that common, but I’m sure I have seen it elsewhere, but I can’t recall where. —Jeffrey

— comment by Endre Toth on December 8th, 2011 at 9:36pm JST (6 years ago) comment permalink

hello, sir!
I really love your awesome photograph.
Since I start to study about photography and also I like everything about Japan (and really want to go to Japan someday), I followed this webpage for that reason.
Your photograph is inspiring me!

— comment by Annisa P. Cinderakasih on December 11th, 2011 at 6:46pm JST (6 years ago) comment permalink

Actually “all kinds of wrong” is another of your “best in class” pics as far as I’m concerned.
Hmmm and where did you get this rule based thing from anyway? A bit like syncopation in music – off the beat (off the centre) is often more dramatic and interesting…
🙂

— comment by Annie in London on December 11th, 2011 at 10:37pm JST (6 years ago) comment permalink

We do have plantings of Tulip trees in urban London. Definitely have got a few in Westminster in between the usual Plane trees and (all around Parliament Square) Indian Bean trees.
But a couple of years ago, pre the current public spending cuts, in our south London High Street (which has a non-posh post code!) they put Gingko alternating between Sorbus, Silver Birch and Prunus.
I got a thing for the Gingkos (as Jeffrey knows that everytime he shoots them I get moved to post!).
Love the Tulip tree too of course and I recently visited my sister-in-law in Essen Germany, and spotted they were planted in the wide central green reservation on the main road to Heisingen. Great choice by the city fathers…

— comment by Annie in London on December 13th, 2011 at 5:30am JST (6 years ago) comment permalink
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