Purple Irises in the Mountains
Wilty-Looking Purple Iris -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/250 sec, f/4, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Wilty-Looking Purple Iris

While on a drive in the mountains of northern Kyoto today, we came across a pretty scene... a small watter-filled field of wilty-looking purple flowers, with a backdrop of the sun setting behind some mountains.

Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/1000 sec, f/4.5, ISO 500, — map & image datanearby photos

To me they were “wilty-looking purple flowers,” but Fumie guessed they were one of three kinds of flowers, each of which turns out to be an iris of some sort when I look up the Japanese names she offered.

Enjoying the Flowers and the Frogs -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 48mm — 1/1000 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Enjoying the Flowers and the Frogs

The field was apparently filled with frogs, their loud din similar to that mentioned the other day.

Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/250 sec, f/4.5, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/125 sec, f/4, ISO 320 — map & image datanearby photos
Hideo Kubo, R.I.P. -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/500 sec, f/4, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Hideo Kubo, R.I.P.

The field held a grave marker for a Hideo Kubo, who was (according to the stone) rather high up in the Japanese Navy at some point in his life. The Japanese Navy hasn't existed since WWII (Japan now has a “Maritime Self Defense Force” rather than a Navy).

The stone doesn't say when he passed, but the condition of the stone suggests closer to now than to WWII; just because the stone mentions his WWII (or prior) military service doesn't mean that he died while in the Navy, but merely that he wanted to be remembered that way.

Turning around and looking the other way shows part of a very typical mountain village, with a garden and a sturdy modernish house in the foreground, with more traditional Japanese countryside houses and some rice fields further back.

Typical Japanese Mountain Homes -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 30mm — 1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Typical Japanese Mountain Homes

All 2 comments so far, oldest first...

What gorgeous photographs!
I think the iris is kakitsubata – Iris laevigata. It is wild in Japan, but also much cultivated. “In the 8th century, travellers who saw I. laevigata as they journeyed were reminded of their lovers, and when they composed a Japanese traditional poem (tanka), they compared this flower to the beautiful women they longed for.” – according to ‘The Pictorial Book of Iris Laevigata, by Akira Horinaka (Abocsha, 1990).

Peter

— comment by Peter on May 29th, 2007 at 5:30pm JST (10 years, 6 months ago) comment permalink

Hi I am an editor of a regional Iris newsletter and I would like to, with your permission use some of your photos to teach others of Iris species.
Thanks for sharing these wonderful photographs
Anita

— comment by Anita on January 4th, 2008 at 10:15pm JST (9 years, 11 months ago) comment permalink
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