The Mountain Claims a Sign, But Doesn’t Claim Me
Here, Let Me Hold That For You -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/ -- This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D700 + Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM — 1/250 sec, f/1.6, ISO 320 — map & image datanearby photos
Here, Let Me Hold That For You

今日は僕の第三回目比叡山山登りハイキングをしました。登るのはやっぱり去年より早い(二時間半じゃ無くて、一時間半)。 以前はバスで帰ったけれども、今回は足で、往復で28½キロ出来ました。嬉しい。ジムのおかげさまで。

Today I did my third annual Mt. Hiei climb. The climb in 2012 is what got me started on the road to getting fit. Then it took me 2h 6m to make the climb and I was completely wiped out. Last year it actually took longer (2h 24m) because I was stopping so much for photography, but I felt much better in doing it than the extra time could explain.

This year it took 1h 36m and I felt just fine when I got to the top, so much so that I didn't stop to rest, and moved on farther to see some temples a kilometer or so down the other side of the mountain. So good did I feel, in fact, that I walked back home as well. Total hike was 28½km (17.7 mile).

It's on the way back that I noticed this sign being claimed by the tree. I think it's a put out your campfires sign, but I'm not sure.

Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2014 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/ -- This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D700 + Sigma 35mm F1.4 DG HSM — 1/250 sec, f/2.2, ISO 720 — map & image datanearby photos

I passed it on the way up all three times, but likely didn't notice it because my head buried into the trail immediately in front of me. Also related is that it was next to one of the trail signs that governed a fork in the trail that didn't matter on the way up, but made a big difference on the way down. The sign was of no help so I just picked one of the paths, and as my GPS tracklog eventually showed, it turns out to have been different from the one I'd taken up, so that explains why for half an hour I had the none of this looks familiar feeling.

But as per the unhelpful sign, it did eventually wind up at the proper spot and I can confirm that I did get home alive.

Continued here...


All 3 comments so far, oldest first...

Nicely embedded! Those signs are relatively common in Kyoto. I’ve seen them a few times but yours is very well embedded indeed.

Actually we saw one when we were shooting in Ohara together. Not as ‘eaten’ as yours, so we can see it was offered by the Lions’ Club. Here’s another one which escaped from the trees’ ferocious appetite.

Ah, good catch… I remembered that there had been a sign, but I thought it was a different one. (I even got a photo of you taking the photo you linked to.) —Jeffrey

— comment by Damien on May 29th, 2014 at 11:53pm JST (3 years, 4 months ago) comment permalink

Hi!

Awesome blog. I’m reading it in portrait mode on my desktop monitor. I’m looking forward to seeing more of your shots!!!! I was looking for wallpapers for my portrait mode oriented screen and came upon this lovely place. Then I see a super talented photographer…Thank you, and I will definitely visit more often.

Nima

— comment by Nima on May 30th, 2014 at 1:47am JST (3 years, 4 months ago) comment permalink

Why the D700? Because it’s lighter?

Yeah, since I’ve well documented the route in prior posts, I mostly wanted the camera for the nice flowers at the top, and to mark my time/location along the way. So I went with the D700 without grip, and just one prime lens. I felt half naked. —Jeffrey

— comment by Mark Sirota (Philadelphia, PA, USA) on May 30th, 2014 at 2:31am JST (3 years, 4 months ago) comment permalink
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