Kyoto’s Souren-ji Temple at f/1.2
Fuzzy at f/1.2 at the Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺), Kyoto Japan  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/160 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Fuzzy at f/1.2
at the Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺), Kyoto Japan

This is a followup to “An f/1.2 + f/5.6 Pair” from two months ago, from an outing introduced the prior day in “A Few Pretty Pictures from Kyoto’s Middle-of-Nowhere Sourenji Temple”. I'd left off with the promise to show a few more f/1.2 shots, so here we finally are.

Nothing here is really that compelling, or even makes good use of the ultra shallow depth of field that f/1.2 affords. Whatever might be notable is more due to “strangeness” than “interest”, but it's a bit off the beaten path so I'm posting them.

Damien and Paul  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/200 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Damien and Paul
Entrance Steps before the turn  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/160 sec, f/1.2, ISO 160 — map & image datanearby photos
Entrance Steps
before the turn
Entrance Steps after the turn  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/160 sec, f/1.2, ISO 125 — map & image datanearby photos
Entrance Steps
after the turn
Funky Trees discussed in the text and comments of this post  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/2500 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Funky Trees
discussed in the text and comments of this post
Backdrop of funky trees  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/5000 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Backdrop
of funky trees
Banister  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/400 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Banister

This kind of shot is cliché, but I like it (also seen recently here), but I'm still trying to get a good one.

Chilly Hands it was quite cold  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/50 sec, f/1.2, ISO 140 — map & image datanearby photos
Chilly Hands
it was quite cold
Morning Constitutional  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/400 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Morning Constitutional
Losing the Effect of thin depth of field as the focus point gets further  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/1000 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Losing the Effect
of thin depth of field as the focus point gets further
Canopy  --  Sourenji Temple (宗蓮寺)  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/  --  This photo is licensed to the public under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ (non-commercial use is freely allowed if proper attribution is given, including a link back to this page on http://regex.info/ when used online)
Nikon D4 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.2 — 1/500 sec, f/1.2, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos
Canopy

Like I said, there's nothing too compelling here, and I don't think any of these pictures are really enhanced by the ultra-shallow depth of field. This says more about my inability to make the best use of the tool than anything bad about the tool.

For what it's worth, I think like “Morning Constitutional” the best, but that has nothing to do with its shallow depth of field.


All 2 comments so far, oldest first...

I, too, like “Morning Constitutional” the best.

— comment by Grandma Friedl, Ohio, USA on January 21st, 2013 at 12:02am JST (4 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink

Hey I kinda look cool in the second pic 🙂
But the chromatic aberration is quite strong. Have you tried to get rid of it?

You look cool all the time. I didn’t try to get rid of the chromatic aberration because I thought it was just your glowing personality, but checking now, I see that Lightroom 4’s purple chromatic aberration slider takes care of it admirably. (It doesn’t take care of the intense bloom of the fringes of your outline where the sun is hitting, but that’s a separate issue.) —Jeffrey

— comment by Damien on January 21st, 2013 at 12:09am JST (4 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink
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