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A Few More Eclipse Photos from Kyoto
NOTE: Images with an icon next to them have been artificially shrunk to better fit your screen; click the icon to restore them, in place, to their regular size.

So, as I mentioned this morning, we had a nice view of the annular eclipse today. I'd never seen one (nor have I ever seen a total eclipse, except on TV). Here are a few more pictures.

First Contact the moon is just starting to nip at the sun, somewhere behind those clouds  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm — 1/1600 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
First Contact
the moon is just starting to nip at the sun, somewhere behind those clouds
35 Minutes To Go quick snap from my veranda using a “D5” 1/ 100,000 filter  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/1600 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
35 Minutes To Go
quick snap from my veranda using a “D5” 1/100,000 filter
Slightly Wider View  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm — 1/1600 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Slightly Wider View

That picture above illustrates in one way just how bright the sun is... I was using stacked filters to cut all but 1/3,200th of the light, leaving everything dark except the sun, which was still completely blown out. I wonder what the dynamic range is during one of these things, between the surface of the moon and the surface of the sun.

Notice the odd colors in the clouds? Sometimes you see that at night with the moon, and I suppose it's related to conditions in the upper atmosphere, but in any case you certainly couldn't see it in person because either you were using special sun goggles (which made everything but the sun completely black), or you were looking with the naked eye and anything that close to the sun was too bright to look at.

So the colors look odd, but we'd probably see them often during the day if our eyes could handle the brightness. (And speaking of handling the brightness, I've nudged up the variance of some of these shots in Lightroom, to exaggerate the colors for artistic effect.)

For the main event, I moved to near the main gate of the Heian Shrine, which has appeared many times on my blog (such as this shot from six and a half years ago). The sun was coming up behind it lengthwise, so I wondered whether the distinctive “oriental” shape of its silhouette would be interesting.

Partial Eclipse Main gate of the Heian Shrine, Kyoto Japan 11 minutes before annularity  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 95mm — 1/125 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Partial Eclipse
Main gate of the Heian Shrine, Kyoto Japan
11 minutes before annularity

The sun is completely blown out (no detail whatsoever), but I like how the reflections (refractions?) in the lens make for a green “ghost” of the eclipse just to the right of the sun, and an inverted red “ghost” down below.

Oops jiggly tripod reverberations become apparent during a misfire  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/15 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Oops
jiggly tripod reverberations become apparent during a misfire
That's Better small sunspot about to get occluded  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/1600 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
That's Better
small sunspot about to get occluded
Another Oops but a pretty one  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/6 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Another Oops
but a pretty one
Second Contact you can see some sun peaking through some valleys a few seconds after the nominal start of the full ring effect  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/1600 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Second Contact
you can see some sun peaking through some valleys
a few seconds after the nominal start of the full ring effect

I was surprised at how it didn't become dark. The sun was 94% covered (6% exposed) but you couldn't really tell... you certainly couldn't look at it with the naked eye without regretting it instantly, and if you didn't know something was going on, you might not even notice. With 94% hidden. The sun is really really really really bright.

Skirting The Edge  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/1600 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Skirting The Edge
Trying That Shot Again  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 190mm — 1/160 sec, f/7.1, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Trying That Shot Again

I really couldn't see on the back of the camera whether anything was working out, so I just gave it a shot.

Spectators  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/320 sec, f/6.3, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Spectators

I heard that the park area along the length of the Kamo River (such as seen here and here) was absolutely packed. It sounds festive.

Note Quite Sure but looks interesting  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/6 sec, f/8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Note Quite Sure
but looks interesting
Trying With Fewer Filters  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Trying With Fewer Filters
Departing Moon  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 300mm f/2 + 1.4X TC @ 420mm cropped — 1/2500 sec, f/11, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Departing Moon
Those Crazy Colors looking very moon-like  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm — 1/250 sec, f/6.3, ISO 320 — map & image datanearby photos
Those Crazy Colors
looking very moon-like
Where is my green “ghost”?  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm — 1/250 sec, f/6.3, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Where
is my green “ghost”?
A Bit Of Detail in the shadows on this one at the expense of the sun and “ghost” blowing out even further  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm — 1/80 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
A Bit Of Detail
in the shadows on this one
at the expense of the sun and “ghost” blowing out even further
Less Blowout  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm — 1/800 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Less Blowout
No Filters but still needed a zippy 1/ 8,000 th of a second to get even this  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/8000 sec, f/5, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
No Filters
but still needed a zippy 1/8,000th of a second to get even this

Comments so far....

Thanks for posting these views. At our location in California we were able to see the way that sunlight coming through trees cast crescent-shaped highlights (at the peak of the eclipse). We are about 200 miles off of the “full eclipse” track. Tom

— comment by Tom in SF on May 22nd, 2012 at 1:03am JST (2 years, 7 months ago) comment permalink

Regarding the dynamic range of a partial eclipse:
German Wikipedia has the sun at 300000 to 400000 times the brightness of the full moon and the earthshine on the “dark” side of the moon at 0.01% of the full moon. Both sun and moon have approx. the same apparent “area” seen from Earth. That makes the moon in front of the sun about 0.00000000025 to 0.00000000033 times the brightness of the sun – roughly 31.5 to 32 stops, I think. Maybe just this once HDR is justified ;-)
(Btw., that also explains nicely why it wasn’t dark – the 1/16th sun still beats 20000 full moons…)

— comment by Andreas Weber on May 22nd, 2012 at 1:37am JST (2 years, 7 months ago) comment permalink

Wish I had proper equipment for this… what/how many filters were you using? I had what I had to hand, stacked +2, +4 and +8 ND filters of a size too small for my 400mm lens, manually set the camera to f/40, 1/8000, ISO 100… and still had to turn down exposure in LR to get a “clear” image.

I attempted (as I do with practically every eclipse, solar or lunar, that I’m fortunate to see) to do a time-lapse, snapping a photo every minute. But, as usual I didn’t have my tripod so it was hand held… and I now come to find out with 88 photos to merge that Photoshop won’t auto-align… “not enough overlap” :( Oh well, in a year or two I’ll get around to manually aligning all of them together. In the meantime, just two will have to do. http://www.flickr.com/photos/eaglekepr/7255320222/

For the 300mm I had a 1/100,000th solar filter ($60 or so from amazon.co.jp), and for the 70-200 I stacked 8-stop and 3-stop filters that I had lying around. —Jeffrey

— comment by JasonP on May 23rd, 2012 at 9:55pm JST (2 years, 7 months ago) comment permalink

I could look at the annular eclipse through a infrared R72 filter. Was the correct protection for my eyes, and I could see the eclipse very well in Los Angeles Area. I had the bright idea to photograph using Ilford SFX200 film, at various exposure settings. The film is infrared sensitive film. Processed the film got wonderful photographs of the sun but no eclipse. Congratulations on your photographs, the moral of my experiment, do not use IR film!

— comment by Jerry Collier` on May 24th, 2012 at 12:57am JST (2 years, 7 months ago) comment permalink

Hi

some of the pictures have ISO 1000 in the line below… Is that a typo?
Some pretty cool pictures!

Not a typo. The full solar filter makes even the sun a bit dark, and since I was doing some of these handheld, I wanted a fast-enough sensor. On the D700 ISO 1,000 is very clean, so I picked that and went with it for the day. —Jeffrey

— comment by Nils Pickert on May 25th, 2012 at 3:00am JST (2 years, 7 months ago) comment permalink
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