Delicious Yuba Lunch at Junsei, Near Kyoto’s Kiyomizu Temple
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desktop background image of young ladies in traditional Japanese kimono holding Nikon SLRs  --  Just Because girls in kimono with nice cameras  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/640 sec, f/2.5, ISO 450 — map & image datanearby photos
Just Because
girls in kimono with nice cameras
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The other day in “On The Way To Lunch: Eastern-Kyoto StrollI ended with a few shots of the girls above taking advantage of a photogenic location, made more so for everyone else by their presence.

I was heading to the Kiyomizu branch of the most excellent Junsei Tofu Restaurant to have lunch with Paul Barr. The branch is so named because it's near the front gate of the Kiyomizu Temple, in an area that usually packed with tourists, so the quiet elegance of the restaurant is a welcome relief from the crowds. I learned of it from a friend who occasionally helps out with running the place.

Exceedingly Fresh Yuba At the Kiyomizu “Junsei” Restaurant (順正清水店) Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/640 sec, f/2.5, ISO 3600 — map & image datanearby photos
Exceedingly Fresh Yuba
At the Kiyomizu “Junsei” Restaurant (順正清水店)
Kyoto, Japan

The place is known for its tofu, always made that day, but having been there a couple of times in the last month, I've decided that I prefer the opportunity for extremely fresh yuba (湯葉) — “tofu skin” — which literally develops before your eyes on a heated dish of soy milk.

Once the “skin” forms, you lift it with a bamboo stick...

Bite-Sized Portion skimmed from the top of a heated dish of soy milk  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 — 1/640 sec, f/1.4, ISO 450 — map & image datanearby photos
Bite-Sized Portion
skimmed from the top of a heated dish of soy milk
Dip in a Light Sauce  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Voigtländer 125mm f/2.5 — 1/640 sec, f/2.5, ISO 6400 — map & image datanearby photos
Dip in a Light Sauce
Ready to Enjoy  --  Kyoto, Japan  --  Copyright 2012 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 50mm f/1.4 — 1/640 sec, f/1.4, ISO 450 — map & image datanearby photos
Ready to Enjoy

Tofu generally doesn't have much taste on its own, but can take on a wonderful range of tastes when artfully prepared. Yuba, on the other hand, does have its own very yummy taste.

The set yuba lunch comes with a lot of stuff besides the yuba itself, and at ¥2,150 is a great value. The entrance to the restaurant is here (but note that the building is too new to be shown on the satellite view.).

Continued here...


All 2 comments so far, oldest first...

I’d love to go there sometime for lunch. Yuba is truly yummy, as you said.

I am free any Wednesday. Let me know a good day for you.

— comment by Arthur on May 1st, 2012 at 7:50am JST (5 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

JUST BECAUSE is a great photo. Not many things as sublime as a woman in a kimono.., okay TWO women in kimonos. And then that juxtaposition of the Nikon cameras. Those don’t look like punk-@$$ kit lenses either. When you look at this photo you find yourself longing to see the faces that belong to these two figures. Its like an unfinished story, but in a good way.

Something about this photo is also quintessential Japan: the obvious cues being, Japanese people, kimonos and Japanese cameras… but it also shows the Japanese love for tech/gadgets.And that interesting dance between traditional and modern that is always fascinating to witness in Japan. Great shot.

— comment by Ron Evans on May 2nd, 2012 at 7:22am JST (5 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink
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