“What am I?” Quiz: Nature Version
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What am I? -- Copyright 2009 Jeffrey Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D700 + Nikkor 24-70mm f/2.8 @ 70 mm — 1/500 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200 — map & image datanearby photos
What am I?

Out for a walk in the countryside today, I came across something I'd never seen before. If you don't know what it is, can you guess?


All 10 comments so far, oldest first...

Wow – sure looked like leaves at first. Mushrooms of some sort?

— comment by Marcina on April 3rd, 2009 at 9:34pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

I was going to say the same thing as Marcina… looks like a field of mushrooms.

— comment by Derek on April 3rd, 2009 at 9:37pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

Dried up shiitake mushrooms or squirrel ravaged pine cones.

— comment by Ron Evans on April 3rd, 2009 at 11:16pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

Fortune cookies, broken in quarters.

— comment by parv on April 3rd, 2009 at 11:18pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

It looks like the remainders of a fir cone (or similar) that a squirrel left.

— comment by Alexander Kunz on April 3rd, 2009 at 11:26pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

I’m guessing either dried up pods or that someone decided to shave a tree 😛

— comment by renr on April 3rd, 2009 at 11:40pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

I believe, from what I can make out, that Alexander and Ron are probably correct. Otherwise, my guess would be Ginkgo tree pods? I can’t really see clearly.

— comment by Grandma Friedl on April 3rd, 2009 at 11:53pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

I’d suggest cone-scales of a fir (Abies, not a pine (Pinus).

Abies cones break up naturally on the tree, to release the seeds, and leaving the spike-like axis on the branch. Cones of pine and most other conifers fall off intact (the scales opening and closing with changes in humidity to allow the seeds to fall out) – or are wrecked by squirrels or birds, each in its own characteristic way.

Peter, in Wales

— comment by Peter on April 4th, 2009 at 12:25am JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

Yay, Peter! I knew we could count on you. Hope Jeff gives us a closer look up into the tree, or of some intact cones.

Grandma Friedl, Ohio USA

— comment by Grandma Friedl on April 4th, 2009 at 5:45am JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink

I too am going to go with fir cone. I grew up in Washington State and these look very much like Douglas Fir(Pacific Silver Fir) cones after they’ve been consumed by an animal.

— comment by Earnest Barr on April 4th, 2009 at 3:09pm JST (8 years, 8 months ago) comment permalink
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