Rivers of Noodles in Kibune

So, yesterday's post left off with a photo from the stairs looking at the dining platforms over the upper river. The stairs were those going down to the lower “noodle platforms” (where the noodle part of the lunch is to be eaten), and so here's a view from the same position, looking down at them.

The “Noodle Platforms” at Hirobun, in Kibune Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/320 sec, f/4, ISO 250 — map & image datanearby photos
The “Noodle Platforms” at Hirobun, in Kibune
Kyoto, Japan

Here's more of a zoom. Notice the trough-like thing in front of the counter Aunt Jeannette is sitting on?


Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/180 sec, f/2.8, ISO 250 — map & image datanearby photos

That trough-like thing is really a flume in which water — and occasionally soumen noodles — flow. You sit in front of the flume, watching for noodles that you pluck out and eat. The flume is really supposed to be made of bamboo trunks cut in half, but in this respect the restaurant opted for something easier (and perhaps more sanitary).

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55 f/2.8 @ 34mm — 1 / 60 sec, f/4, ISO 250 — full exif & map — nearby photos Going For Noodles -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 34mm — 1/60 sec, f/4, ISO 250 — full exif & mapnearby photos
Going For Noodles
Got'em! -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/60 sec, f/4, ISO 250 — map & image datanearby photos
Got'em!

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/90 sec, f/4, ISO 250, — map & image datanearby photos
Satisfaction Earned, Giving them to Daddy
while Aunt Jeannette maintains a vigilant watch for further noodles

I've got to apologize for the lack of photographic quality with these shots. I was leaning way over the edge trying to get the picture, yet at the same time I was the final line of defense for escaping noodles. Once they passed me, they went down a drain to Lord knows where, but as the waitress said, “they won't come back.” So, I had to remain on my toes to quickly replace the camera with my chopsticks and perform an emergency noodle rescue operation from time to time.

Aunt Jeannette Strikes -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 24mm — 1/60 sec, f/4, ISO 250 — map & image datanearby photos
Aunt Jeannette Strikes
Remaining Purposeful in Victory -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/45 sec, f/4, ISO 250, — map & image datanearby photos
Remaining Purposeful in Victory

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 32mm — 1/80 sec, f/4, ISO 250, — map & image datanearby photos
Looks Like These Might Get Away

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/250 sec, f/4, ISO 250, — map & image datanearby photos
Well, Got a Few...

After a while, three bunches of pink, plum-flavored noodles came, indicating that our meal was complete.

I don't know what it is about plucking noodles from a stream, but it seems to cause the tongue to become firmly planted between clenched lips.... at least in those pictured in this post. 🙂

It also seems to cause an infectious outbreak of fun and smiles.

For reference, this is called nagashi soumen — 流しそうめん — “flowing noodles.”

Little Japanese Boy with a Full Tummy Sitting seiza style -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 22mm — 1/80 sec, f/4, ISO 250, — map & image datanearby photos
Little Japanese Boy with a Full Tummy
Sitting seiza style

All 3 comments so far, oldest first...

If I melted any more, I’d flow right down that noodle drain. Appealing post, though it appears that George overindulged and passed out again. Who knew he loved noodles that much? Enjoyed it all.

— comment by Grandma Friedl on June 27th, 2007 at 10:42am JST (10 years, 6 months ago) comment permalink

As I look at the post again this morning, I began to wonder just where the noodles were coming from. I surmise from the thatched wonky structure with two tubes in the background. The noodles surely must be cooked elsewhere…

Yes, at the main inn across the street.

… then dropped in the tubes by an unseen someone who must be able to view the diners, much like the “Talking Snowman” at shopping malls at Christmas..Wonder where the water is piped from too. A fun and interesting concept.A delightful post.

What are you implying about the snowmen at the malls? That they can’t talk? Really, you don’t expect me to believe I’ve been fooled all this time, now do you? Now, if global warming hadn’t melted them all, we could discuss the noodle situation with them…. —Jeffy

— comment by Grandma Friedl on June 27th, 2007 at 10:07pm JST (10 years, 6 months ago) comment permalink

Soo cute! ^-^ ( I know I’m YEARS late to this post, but it’s very interesting and kawaii.) =D

— comment by Ota on August 14th, 2011 at 2:14am JST (6 years, 4 months ago) comment permalink
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