Solid Copper Rain Gutter
Solid Copper Rain Gutter -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/80 sec, f/5, ISO 400 — full exif
Solid Copper Rain Gutter

On our stroll through Kibune (hamlet in the mountains of northern Kyoto) last month, we came across the most impressive rain gutter and downspout I've ever seen. It was clearly made of solid copper, and looked as if it could withstand anything man, beast, or nature could throw at it.

Copper, Black, and Tan -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/60 sec, f/4, ISO 400 — full exif
Copper, Black, and Tan

I thought the flowers to the side were interesting as well, although my pictures didn't come out very well.

Small Floral Starbursts -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/90 sec, f/5, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos
Small Floral Starbursts
Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/125 sec, f/5, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos
A Veritable Fourth of July of Floral Excitement -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 19mm — 1/80 sec, f/5, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos
A Veritable Fourth of July of Floral Excitement

All 3 comments so far, oldest first...

Edgeworthia chrysantha – isn’t it splendid, though not quite on a par with the copper guttering. How come the latter doesn’t tarnish, I wonder – clear lacquer perhaps? Heaven forbid that it’s actually plastic!

It was clearly very new, almost unnaturally clean. It must have been outlandishly expensive, and was certainly selected more for its form than function. I’m sure they’ll tend to it carefully. I might ask them about it next time I’m in the area. —Jeffrey

The Edgeworthia is Chinese, but cultivated in Japan for aeons, mainly for paper-making. I’ve a feeling I read somewhere that it is still used in Japanese banknotes, but may well have mis-remembered that.

Peter (Hope I’m not becoming the botanical bore)

Bore? Heaven’s no, I’m counting on you! Ever since your kind identification of the echium wildpretii, I’ve had you in mind when processing photos with plants. I have many in the queue, and I’ll be looking for your insightful comments once they’re posted. In your honor, my next post will be flowers galore.

— comment by Peter on May 15th, 2007 at 12:32am JST (10 years, 6 months ago) comment permalink

>(Hope I’m not becoming the botanical bore)
I can only speak for myself, but I’m really glad you take the time to name some of the plants in Jeffrey’s amazing photos. Thanks!

Yeah, and I too was wondering why that lovely copper wasn’t green? Maybe it’s still new?

— comment by Marcina on May 15th, 2007 at 6:11am JST (10 years, 6 months ago) comment permalink

Ditto that, Marci. I also appreciate the identification, Peter. I thought it looked like some kind of Jasmine at first. And seeing that gorgeous gutter made me put on the brakes of the guttering we ordered this morning for our garage. I might want to rethink this, get a few quotes, etc. Not exactly the usual rain chains Japan is noted for.

— comment by Grandma Friedl on May 15th, 2007 at 9:41am JST (10 years, 6 months ago) comment permalink
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