Kyoto Fall Foliage Desktops
Main Garden at the Enkouji Temple Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55/2.8 @ 17mm — 1 / 180 sec, f/11, ISO 800 — map & image data Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2006 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Main Garden at the Enkouji Temple
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/180 sec, f/11, ISO 800 — map & image data
Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600

More pictures from my outing yesterday to Konpukuji Temple and Enkouji Temple, for their fall foliage.

This time I present a few desktop backgrounds, and as I did with the Cherry-Blossom Desktops, I'm providing both standard and widescreen versions. The two “standard” sizes are appropriate for common 4 × 3 displays, while the “widescreen” versions are appropriate for Apple MacBooks and Cinema Displays, up to an expansive 2,560 × 1,660.

Main Garden at the Enkouji Temple Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55/2.8 @ 17mm — 1 / 500 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500 — map & image data Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2006 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Main Garden at the Enkouji Temple
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/500 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500 — map & image data
Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600

Those first two pictures are of the same garden, so they show how dynamic the view was: sometimes a lot of red & orange, and sometimes a lot of green. By the time the colors hit their peak, the floor of the garden will be blanketed in red, so despite the colors, it's really just the very beginning of the season. (This, despite how colorful the garden looks from above.)

In the next picture, we see a leaf alone in a gutter/stream, far away from its friends.

A red "momiji" leaf fallen in the water outside the Enkouji Temple, Kyoto Japan, November 2006
Alone
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/80 sec, f/5.6, ISO 320 — map & image data
Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600
Bamboo Canopy at the Enkouji Temple Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55/2.8 @ 17mm — 1 / 10 sec, f/10, ISO 320 — map & image data Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2006 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Bamboo Canopy at the Enkouji Temple
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/10 sec, f/10, ISO 320 — map & image data
Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600

Bamboo is evergreen, so it provides a nice backdrop to the fall foliage, and in this case, a backdrop for my computer desktop.

If you look at the big version of the next picture, notice how the water glistens off the leaves in the left half of the picture. I think it's really pretty, although it loses much of its impact when shrunk down for display below.

Autumn Leaves at the Konpukuji Temple Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55/2.8 @ 55mm — 1 / 160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 100 — map & image data Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2006 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Autumn Leaves at the Konpukuji Temple
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 100 — map & image data
Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600
Changing Colors at the Enkouji Temple Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55/2.8 @ 34mm — 1 / 200 sec, f/2.8, ISO 320 — full exif Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600 -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2006 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Changing Colors at the Enkouji Temple
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55/2.8 @ 34mm — 1/200 sec, f/2.8, ISO 320 — full exif
Standard: 1280 × 960   ·   1600 × 1200      Widescreen:   1280 × 800   ·   1680 × 1050   ·   1920 × 1200   ·   2560 × 1600

I find this last picture a bit disconcerting because I don't really know what to focus on when I look at it. But perhaps for that same reason, it may make a nice desktop background, so I've included it here.


All 5 comments so far, oldest first...

Many thanks – I just switched mine. I’m not sure if you remember Kalyan Varma – a friend and junior from Y! Blr, he was my previous source. Just for some interesting photographs, you might want to explore:

http://www.kalyanvarma.net/photography/viewtags.php?tag=All

he is now a full time photographer and a part time security consultant 😉

— comment by mmk on November 23rd, 2006 at 6:37am JST (11 years ago) comment permalink

Hey Madhu, which one did you choose?

Kalyan’s blog has been in my reader for a long time, and he’s indeed an excellent photographer.

— comment by Jeffrey Friedl on November 23rd, 2006 at 11:34am JST (11 years ago) comment permalink

GREAT pics!!
Now I am able to change daily.

— comment by Thomas on November 23rd, 2006 at 10:34pm JST (11 years ago) comment permalink

I would just like to say these ics are great. colours and quality are amazing . Now i have the most relaxing desktop i have ever had.

— comment by John on May 15th, 2007 at 5:44am JST (10 years, 6 months ago) comment permalink

Thank you so much for sharing these beautiful photos! How thoughtful of you! Thank You Again,
Debi

— comment by Debi on October 26th, 2007 at 7:14am JST (10 years ago) comment permalink
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