Odd Things in Western Kyoto

Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm — 1/400 sec, f/9, ISO 400 — map & image datanearby photos
Huh?

The other day while scootering around western Kyoto, I paid a visit to something that looked odd in Google Maps, to see what it actually was.

It seemed to be a building of cube rooms...


Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/200 sec, f/9, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos

Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 170mm — 1/400 sec, f/6.3, ISO 220 — map & image datanearby photos

Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 102mm — 1/250 sec, f/6.3, ISO 160 — map & image datanearby photos

Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/6.3, ISO 100 — map & image datanearby photos

It turns out to be an assisted-living nursing home named Life in Kyoto (ライフ・イン京都) with 226 units ranging from 350 ft² to 920 ft². It seems a bit pricey to move in... of the four units currently available, the largest is a scant 445 ft², but costs $350,000 for a single person to move in, or $470,000 for a couple. As far as I can tell, that's just a fee... you're not getting any equity.

On top of that, there's a monthly fee of about $1,000/month for a couple, and $650/month per person for meal service (about $21/day for three meals, which seems like a good deal).

You have to be 55 or older to move in. If you're like my grandmother-in-law who passed away this summer at 99, the $350,000 fee to move in at 55 prorates to $8,000 a year. If you move in at 65 and live to 83 (the average life expediency in Japan), that works out to almost $20,000/year. I guess, like everything in life, it's a gamble.

The view is nice... here's a shot from the neighboring building, with Kyoto Tower about 7km (4¼ miles) away:


Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 200mm — 1/400 sec, f/6.3, ISO 160 — map & image datanearby photos

Not far away, while slowly puttering through a very residential area on the western edge of the city, I came across a tiny park, large enough to accommodate only a few cars were it a parking lot. But it was a park, and it accommodated exactly one 1911-era steam locomotive:


Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/5, ISO 1250 — map & image datanearby photos
Circa 1911 O&K Type C1 Steam Locomotive
at SL Park (SL公園), Kyoto Japan

Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/10, ISO 450 — map & image datanearby photos
Information Display
what's left of it

Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1250 — map & image datanearby photos
Inside

This is the unsurprising answer to last week's A Black-on-Black “What am I?” Quiz.


Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/2.8, ISO 180 — map & image datanearby photos
Choo-Choo

Nikon D4 + Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 @ 70mm — 1/160 sec, f/2.8, ISO 280 — map & image datanearby photos

Odd to find this tucked away in a fringe residential area. It calls to mind the one-man kamikaze submarine that used to be on display not far away in Arashiyama. Here's a photo of a marble monument that I took seven years ago:


Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 at an effective 72mm — 1/20 sec, f/5.6, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Type 10 Kaiten One-Man Kamikaze Sub

The sub (torpedo really) itself used to actually be on display here in this pretty little garden off on one side of a restaurant, but it was moved to Hiroshima. There was also a crudely-carved painted wooden sign:


Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 at an effective 25mm — 1/80 sec, f/5.6, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos

I noted in a blog post in 2011 that the marble plaque had been removed as well.

Anyway, one can certainly come across some odd things in western Kyoto.


All 3 comments so far, oldest first...

Trains are an interest of mine. I enjoyed seeing the images of the steam engine.

— comment by Tom in SF on October 16th, 2014 at 10:37pm JST (2 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink

2014 10 20 Burlington Ontario Canada 01:02

Orienstein & Keppel, well-known German builder of locomotives of various track gauges. Some of their
locomotives still operate on preserved operations in Austria and elsewhere.

— comment by Bryce Lee on October 20th, 2014 at 2:02pm JST (2 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink

Orienstein & Keppel are making joint bearings for vehicles and trailers. Orienstein & Koppel are the ones funded in 1876 and making locomotives, construction equipment and elevators escalators…

— comment by Denis Pagé on November 5th, 2014 at 11:30pm JST (2 years, 9 months ago) comment permalink
Leave a comment...


All comments are invisible to others until Jeffrey approves them.

Please mention what part of the world you're writing from, if you don't mind. It's always interesting to see where people are visiting from.


You can use basic HTML; be sure to close tags properly.

Subscribe without commenting