Life and Death of a Small Wooden Tower
Large-Scale Construction with a bunch of small wooden planks -- Otsu, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2008 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 @ 55 mm — 1/30 sec, f/5, ISO 640 — map & image datanearby photos
Large-Scale Construction
with a bunch of small wooden planks

One of the rooms at the “Otsu Yumekko” (a nearby playland we visited in February) is set aside for playing with Kapla planks. They have thousands of them, and the space is large, so it was like a mini Dubai with all the various construction going on...

Lots Going On -- Otsu, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2008 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 @ 17 mm — 1/100 sec, f/2.8, ISO 640 — map & image datanearby photos
Lots Going On

Each big box holds 1,000 pieces, and runs about 400 bucks! They had plenty.

One guy was making a tall tower with a little boy...

Otsu, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2008 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 @ 24 mm — 1/40 sec, f/5, ISO 640 — map & image datanearby photos
You Know It's Just a Matter of Time -- Otsu, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2008 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 @ 48 mm — 1/60 sec, f/3.5, ISO 640 — map & image datanearby photos
You Know It's Just a Matter of Time

Knowing that a kid that young severely shortens the life span of anything built with balance, I kept one eye on them prepared to catch the inevitable collapse.

Getting Their Picture -- Otsu, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2008 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 @ 40 mm — 1/125 sec, f/3.2, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Getting Their Picture

I felt relieved for the guy when he finally got his own picture, and sure enough, 20 seconds later the kid bumped the thing, tried to catch it (which is like trying to hold back the tide), and it all came crashing down...

In The Blink of an Eye -- Otsu, Shiga, Japan -- Copyright 2008 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55mm f/2.8 @ 55 mm — 1/80 sec, f/3.2, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
In The Blink of an Eye

Fun stuff.


All 5 comments so far, oldest first...

Kapla:

literally means success, in Klingon…
“Kapla” (used before battle)

— comment by Highlord on December 28th, 2008 at 6:58pm JST (8 years, 11 months ago) comment permalink

I’m pretty sure this is a sneaky way to allow adults to play mega jenga 🙂
This looks too much fun!

— comment by David on December 28th, 2008 at 7:52pm JST (8 years, 11 months ago) comment permalink

You know, I just saw (and played with) Kapla planks for the first time yesterday! I took the kids to the local Children’s museum. And though we’ve been there dozens of times, we discovered a new little room yesterday for the first time. They had a table with a few hundred kapla planks on it. Fun! (Though a few thousand planks would be more fun!) Funny that you should blog about them the very next day.

— comment by Marcina on December 29th, 2008 at 1:34am JST (8 years, 11 months ago) comment permalink

Wow! This kapla room would be heaven for Jace!

— comment by Ly Doan on December 31st, 2008 at 1:47am JST (8 years, 11 months ago) comment permalink

Hey, nice to see this. I remember that back in kindergarten we also had a room like that and I remember that my gang constructed several buildings twice the size of the small boys building them at that time. One looked like the Colliseum in Rome.
Another classic we played with our kapla stones was of course domino. And with the combination of both domino and the architecture thing you could have a wonderful time for weeks and weeks. This room is actually the only positive and remarkable thing I remember from kindergarten 😉

— comment by Daniel N. Lang on January 1st, 2009 at 8:00pm JST (8 years, 11 months ago) comment permalink
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