The Most-Excellent Architecture of Kyoto Station

The main building of Kyoto Station, built 10 years ago, is not possible to adequately describe. It's a marvel of human engineering and visual slight of hand. I've been there many times (the first being not long after its grand opening, the day after my wedding), but I still always find something about it that surprises and delights me. Considering that in all the times I've been there, I've only really seen a total of about 10% of the place, so I've still got a lot to look forward to.

In a future post I will attempt to instil an appreciation for just how amazing and impossible-to-describe a place it is, but for this post, I offer just a few random pictures.

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1 / 6000 sec, f/2.8, ISO 800 — map & image data — nearby photos A North-Side Overlook at about the 5th-floor level, with Kyoto Tower in the background -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/6000 sec, f/2.8, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
A North-Side Overlook
at about the 5th-floor level, with Kyoto Tower in the background
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1 / 90 sec, f/5.6, ISO 500 — map & image data — nearby photos Reflections, and Reflections of Reflections a third of the way up, from the 10th-floor level -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/90 sec, f/5.6, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Reflections, and Reflections of Reflections
a third of the way up, from the 10th-floor level

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/400 sec, f/6.3, ISO 800 — map & image datanearby photos
Exterior
somewhere along the north side, at about the 7th-floor level
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1 / 500 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500 — map & image data — nearby photos Way Too Early except for kids -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/500 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Way Too Early
except for kids
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17 -55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1 / 500 sec, f/9, ISO 500 — map & image data — nearby photos South Promenade at about the 4th-floor level -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 17mm — 1/500 sec, f/9, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
South Promenade
at about the 4th-floor level

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 19mm — 1/1000 sec, f/8, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Bumpy Face
looking up from the Fourth Floor

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/60 sec, f/8, ISO 250 — map & image datanearby photos
Supports, Walkways, and Reflections
at about the 10th-floor level

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/160 sec, f/2.8, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Crossing the Top of the Atrium
Nikon D200 + Sigma 30mm f/1.4 — 1 / 40 sec, f/1.4, ISO 1000 — map & image data — nearby photos Gathering Place Looking up at almost 10 stories of stairways, from about the 5th-floor level -- Kyoto, Japan -- Copyright 2007 Jeffrey Eric Francis Friedl, http://regex.info/blog/
Nikon D200 + Sigma 30mm f/1.4 — 1/40 sec, f/1.4, ISO 1000 — map & image datanearby photos
Gathering Place
Looking up at almost 10 stories of stairways, from about the 5th-floor level

Nikon D200 + Nikkor 17-55 f/2.8 @ 55mm — 1/800 sec, f/2.8, ISO 500 — map & image datanearby photos
Looking Across an Atrium
Fumie liked the this in black and white
Continued here...
One comment so far...

Hi Jeffery,

Love the photos.
Hooked me with your ‘I hate Kyoto’!

Lived there in 1985. Couldn’t stand it.

Now in Nara 30 years on.

Are you still in the country, still taking photos?
Have an idea to give you more exposure, with credit.

Cheers,
Duncan

— comment by Duncan White on January 10th, 2016 at 12:04am JST (1 year, 11 months ago) comment permalink
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